Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Know thyself.

When I knit these socks I made no effort to match up the starting points. "Hey," I thought, "I'm a free-spirited kind of gal. Who needs socks with exactly matching stripes? Not me!"


(I love how tiny the unstretched sock is.)



As it turns out, I don't need stripes that match. But I need toes that match, or at least toes that aren't so boldly mismatched. These are my most comfortable socks, and I like the colors and the stripes and the fit and pretty much everything about them ..... except that one yellow toe.

Too bad I mostly wear them with sandals.

And I'm kind of torn here. Because I have a bunch of other self striping yarns in my sock stash, and I'm not quite sure what to do. I kind of like the mismatched legs. Even mismatched heels seems kind of charming to me. But the toes -- no. (The difference? I'm not really sure. Except it might be that I see them all the time.) So I don't really want to start each sock at the same point in the color repeat, so that everything matches. I wear such boring clothes (winter: blue jeans, plain colored turtleneck, probably white or blue; summer: jean shorts, plain colored v-necked t-shirt, probably white or yellow or turquoise -- what was it with turquoise last summer? Everything I tried on that fit was turquoise or teal) -- anyways, I wear such boring clothes that a little mismatching in the socks kind of livens things up.

But how can I have random legs/heels/feet on the socks and matched toes? I suppose I could get down to around the start of toe shaping and then fiddle around with the color repeat to get myself in the same place. But isn't that sort of weird?

2 comments:

Shan said...

I guess you could do the toes and heels out of a contrasting solid...I like that effect.

I am a non-matcher too but I have to admit the yellow toe would obsess me too.

Maia said...

You could knit one sock from the inside of the ball and one from the outside. Or you could start on at the beginning of a large color band (pink on these socks) and the other from the end of that same color.